Last night, I was sitting on the potty reading a catalog. From the next room, I heard the state police dispatcher saying something about a rollover. Then I heard her asking a shift supervisor if a certain town was in their patrol area. The dispatcher must have been new… The town was in the dispatcher’s patrol district; in fact, the town she mentioned is about a mile from where I was sitting; the town with my fire station in it, as a matter of fact. I realized I was probably going to get called, so I quickly finished my reading and went back into the other room. Then the tone went off.

I was first to the fire station and got in Engine 1. Another FF hopped in and we drove just up the street to the rollover, which had occurred right around several sharp corners. The chief and deputy chief were already on scene. The wrecked car was on its roof in a ditch; no one was in it. Several young adults were standing nearby.

I went up to the group and asked who had been in the car. Only one person had. They stated that they were fine. With their permission, I did a rapid assessment, then told the person that they would need to sign off when the ambulance arrived. I talked to the group for a few moments longer, then went and relieved the deputy chief doing traffic control (officers, of course, shouldn’t be overworked).

That was pretty much that. I got to see the nice cop that showed up yell at one of the group for being idiotic. I got to play with flares.

Today, I got toned out to a three car MVA. We arrived on the scene to find that three compact cars carrying twenty(!) members of a local high school female soccer team had mixed it up. They had been on their way to a local orchard to pick apples. The lead vehicle almost drove past the turn and slammed on the brakes; the following two cars sailed into the lead car.

Again, no one was hurt, but it was quite a scene with two wrecked cars (the third was relatively undamaged) and twenty teenaged females milling about. We managed to keep them from getting run over by other cars until their parents came and took them away. Once again, I spent most of my time doing traffic control.

When we finally disposed of the accident participants, we rode up to the orchard in Engine 1 and had lunch at a fund raiser being thrown by our sibling department (sure, we had the engine with us, but we were in service and available). I had left my regular shoes back at the station so I had to wear my turnout gear to lunch.

Ayup.

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