I’m working overnight at my paid squad. Here are a few pictures.

This is A1… Ambulance One. This is the first ambulance to go out. It’s pretty nice, all in all. It’s a diesel and very similar to drive to Engine One from my volunteer department except that E1 is a manual while A1 is automatic. I prefer to ride in back, anyway.

This is my office. From left to right around the stretcher are cabinets with lots of stuff, the CPR seat, the airway seat, the pass-through to the front, another gear cabinet (open for the photo, containing from top to bottom a cardiac monitor/defib, IV drug box, jump bag), and a bench seat. Working in back I spend most of my time on the bench seat, moving to the airway seat when I need to make radio calls from the transceiver above the counter.

This department’s Engine One. Your basic pumper. Hanging overhead are various bits of antique gear. The ladder with the single beam is a Pompier ladder. Thank garsh these things are no longer used. They were used to climb between floors on the outside of the building. Imagine hooking the fifth floor window from the fourth floor window then climbing out the window and up the ladder. Yikes.

The tanker and second pumper.

The ancient ladder truck. No longer in service but fun to climb on when left alone in the station.

The forestry truck and Ambulance Three. A3 is last out which is why it is hidden in the back of the garage. It’s fairly rare to have three simultaneous calls in this neck of the woods.

This view shows A2, A1, and E1. A2 is due to be replaced next month for some reason.

This is a hand-tub from the mid-1800’s. It was manufactured in Boston and served this department for decades. It now lives in the FD dayroom. As late as the 1950s, it was shown in parades and operated from time to time; I’m told the pump has amazing pressure when in use. The FD loaned the tub to the Smithsonian for about twenty years; it was never shown and was very poorly treated. It was stored in a building with a bad roof and exposed to the elements for several years. According to local legend, the FD stole the tub back twenty or so years ago but has not yet had the tub fully restored to the condition it was in before it was loaned.

That’s it; I’m off to bed.

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