Interesting article regarding employer-funded healthcare.

http://www.sacbee.com/content/opinion/story/14214344p-15040397c.html

See http://www.bugmenot.com for credentials.

I do tend to disagree; I do think that it is the employer’s responsibility to care directly for the employee’s health. Supertech has medical and dental; he has a copay but the company completely covers the monthly fees. The new guy (starts Monday) will have benefits after two months. I also think it is the responsibility of the employer to house employees; for now, though, I’ll just pay them. I do agree with the argument that employer-provided plans for most services result in less choice for the employee and a less optimal fit for almost everyone. The other side of the argument, it would seem, is that in the absence of employee-provided plans, most people would probably choose to spend the cash rather than paying for health insurance. The employer is left to act as the parent.

I do not think that this in any way conflicts with my inherent conservatism. It is *not* the role of the government to provide health care or other individual services to any entity. It is the role of the individual entity to care for itself. The business relies on the health, morale, and loyalty of the employee. The employer, then, owes a ‘social obligation’ to the employee on several levels, self-interest being one of the levels.

I had a disagreement with Supertech over dental. The plan we presently have (i.e., can afford) covers preventative but only really is useful if you get hit in the mouth with a baseball or suffer other catastrophic injury. ST didn’t feel that it made sense for the company to provide such a benefit; not that he wanted the money, he was just willing to forego the coverage . Risk-adverse me (heh) pointed out that should ST get hit in the mouth with a baseball, he’d want to get it fixed.

ST is a thoughtful fellow. At first he seemed to be pretty liberal but it seems he is teetering on the brink of conservatism. I’ll be there to provide a solid push.

I sent out one hundred three-page marketing letters today… Actually, five pages; two of the pages are front and back. I will send another hundred within a week; the biggest thing holding me back is that I ran out of business cards… I’ve been putting two into each mailing. I’ve recently modified the logo although the next set of cards will be straight reprints of the last since I need them in a hurry. I will be redoing the rest of my stationary (letterhead and envelopes) in a few weeks and these will have the new logo. Shipping labels already use the logo. We’re having mousepads done soon and they also will have the new logo; in fact, I came up with the ‘stacked with bar’ logo while working on the mousepad design.

The barcode says ‘Swell!’

I feel like running out of my initial stock of stationary is a sort of victory; I’ve been around long enough as an incorporated entity to exhaust my start-up supply.

I have a largish programming project pending with a client that is very interested in streamlining the data flow though their business. I made a tactical error and sent them a task breakdown with a bottom line of 300 hours; in retrospect, I will never again deliver a proposal except in person. I know that I can sell them the solution in person; it will enhance their operations in numerous ways that they haven’t even thought of. They know they need it, too, but are afraid of making the decision; while they have been putting off a meeting to discuss the proposal for two weeks, they paid the invoice for the proposal, a thousand bucks, quite promptly.

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